Skin Deep in Prague

Skin Deep in Prague

Guest Post by Chris Berry

Anyone who knows me knows that I have a weakness for eastern European women. Russian, Ukrainian, Czech, Romanian, Polish. It’s like God sprinkled the most perfect of DNA along the banks of the streams and rivers that come together to form the Black Sea. Something is certainly in that water. I want it bottled and shipped here to the US, ASAP.
The Italian’s even have a word for the natural beauty of the faces from that region. I can’t remember what it is (and if I could, I’d probably spell it wrong) but it roughly translates into the “Round Face.” For some reason buried deep in the most primitive folds of our brain, the bone structure of the eastern European face is universally, genetically pleasing. It’s like the the Golden Ratio of human evolution. It’s why we marvel at buildings like the Acropolis in Athens, at artwork like Da Vinci’s Vetruvian Man, at songs like Pachelbel’s Cannon in D. It’s why we watch Anna Kournikova, yet have no interest whatsoever in the sport of Tennis. There’s a rhythm to the beauty that resonates at a subconscious, yet pleasing, frequency within each of us. You can’t deny it.

What I can deny however, is that I callously planned my first European backpacking adventure around this superficial interest. Prague, Czech Republic would forever be the first European city I stepped foot into. And, no, not because of the natural beauty of its citizens. I’m a history buff. And anyone who knows the history of the region would know that the little country of Czech Republic has been though quite a lot: Nazi control, Soviet control, the Velvet Revolution (and that’s just within the last 70 years). Not to mention, Prague was one of the very few cities not to be heavily bombed during World War I and World War II, meaning much of its 1000 plus year old castles, bridges and cathedrals were still in great condition. I was there for the rich history. The women were just a nice backdrop. And let’s be honest, if I had planned a trip based only on looks, I would have gone to their neighbor to the south: Slovakia. Even Lonely Planet shows the country is known for production of “hockey pucks and beautiful women.” Something in the water. I can’t make this up.

I was in Prague for a total of 5 days and absolutely loved it. During my stay, I was fortunate to meet and spend 3 of those days with a local named Dita. She acted as my translator, tour guide, and cultural liaison. With Dita’s help, and my own sociological background, I was able to learn enough about the people of Prague to make some interesting comparisons with my own peers back in the states.

For starters, superficially, the women were all absolutely ravishing. And I don’t even use that word. I use it here because “beautiful” is overused and diluted. “Hot” is cliche’.  “Pretty” would be an incredible insult. So “ravishing” it is. And I’m not talking about the typical, hardbodied 20-somethings giggling and texting their way through the shopping malls. I stopped dead in my tracks along Wenceslas Square where I saw 2 female traffic cops writing a ticket. At first I thought maybe I was back home and it was Halloween. But no, this was real life. Two sexy cops, just doing their job. Soon after, I saw an attractive female taxi cab driver. They were everywhere. All of them, worthy of being the next Top Model. Forget the world famous castles and cathedrals, my camera should have been focused on them.

Along with the pretty face, I noticed no one was overweight. Male or female. This, I attribute to genes as well. I ate more hearty meals of fatty duck and roast pork with heaping sides of dumplings and potatoes and downed more liters of golden pilzner than I have ever eaten here at home. I know the locals are getting their calories. But, so too with most European cities, the Czechs are much more mobile that we are. They walk, they bike, the play in the beer gardens, So those calories are more likely being burned off.

The third thing I noticed over there was the lack of plastic surgery. US women spend more money on cosmetic “enhancements” than any other society in the world. It was clear that most of the Czech women I saw did not have these same enhancements. And thanks to their natural beauty, it simply wasn’t needed.

But as my college professor would say, “use your sociological imagination” to figure out how the superficial outside of the group effect the inside.  First, a man’s look at women in the United States:

It’s nearly impossible to find the perfect mix of beauty and personality. There are so few “perfect 10s” out there, that those who are lucky enough to fall into that category can afford to be picky. They can afford to be uninteresting. They can afford to be rude, stuck up and downright mean. They will still be desired by a large number of men, based simply on their looks. On the other hand, more unattractive girls (for whatever reason) are usually the ones men get along with the easiest. This is because these girls have had to adapt and develop interesting personalities and strong senses of humor in order to attract attention. But now, easy access to cosmetic surgery has been added to the equation. The once unattractive women can now change their looks and with it, their confidence and personality. They raise themselves through expensive augmentation to the level of those who never needed to form a personality to begin with. The sad fact is, as we mature, we learn that attitude and what lies within is what makes someone truly ugly or beautiful. Your plastic surgeon can’t fix that.

Now before you get upset, allow me to point out the same goes for men. I’ll use myself as an example: I’ve never had large muscles or flashy tail feathers, so instead, I’ve used humor and intelligence to further my social interactions. More and more men and going under the knife for the same reasons women do. Calf implants? Really?? Pathetic.

In a magical place like Prague, where everyone is naturally attractive, the girls there have had to adapt using different tactics. The playing field is genetically equal. Guys aren’t having to fight for beauty, so there is no competition and, therefore, one can not be picky (or any of the other negative qualities listed above). They’ve instead had to focus all of their attention on the beauty that lies within. Personality. And when you have an equal biological playing field, and the need for cosmetic enhancements are removed from the equation, what you get is an entire nation made up of friendly, funny, accommodating, intelligent AND beautiful women. It’s Heaven. And I will be back.

For the castles, of course.